A Piece for Nara Moto

The last few weeks have been a blur of activity and motion to complete the Sustainable Cup Challenge incubation phase with The DO School.

Just before I left NYC on a bus to Toronto, I got to sit with my Fellow, Nara Motoyama, for a bit and quickly finished her this piece that I started earlier in the day. It is permanent marker on a piece of wood that was left in our apartment.

Here is what Nara is up to with her venture in graphic design:

We Brazilians are usually proud of our country, and not only because of soccer but also because of the beautiful natural environment of Brazil. That’s why we have changed our attitudes about environmental issues. In 2012, 13% of the Brazilian population considers the environment the main problem in the country, that is more than double of 6 years ago, when this rate was 6%. People are getting more aware of the environmental problems that we face in our country, which means that consumers are taking more responsibility for the purchase of their products and services.

With this tendency spreading in the population, existing companies are willing to get greener and social businesses are growing a lot. Those businesses need not only sell their products, but also must be able to express their values to the consumer.

In this context, I believe design should be used to stimulate the discussion and innovation in this area. Design is a fundamental tool to set up more sustainable consumption systems in the country. Not only by helping the development of new products, but also by informing and educating the consumers.

As a designer, I will create a Design Consultancy to work with sustainable brands. I will help companies to identify how they can increase the value of their products by improving communication or finding innovative solutions that would help them become more sustainable. I want to target clients that provide a good social or environmental impact. According to their needs, I will work with their website, branding, social media and other graphic material. The goal will be to reach the consumer in a more effective way.”

To see and vote for the rest of The DO School Fellows’ ventures, check out: http://apply.thedoschool.org/vote/29235/

– Joseph Stodgel 5/7/14

The GOOD TO GO Coffee Cup Canvas Project in Dumbo, NY

As part of the DO School Sustainable Cup Challenge Fellowship here in Brooklyn, NY, my fellows and I organized the creation and dispersal of 13 coffee cup canvases to NYC based artists. I held on to 2 and contributed some artwork to the project as well.

The Cup Canvas Project arose as an artistic and community response to the dilemma of the millions of coffee cups disposed of daily in NYC. Normally, these cups landfilled up to 500 miles away or “downcycled” into inferior paper products. Our cup canvases demonstrate that wasted materials can become something wonderful.

A canvas is made by covering a wooden panel with 10 cups (a New Yorker’s weekly average). Together the 16 panels represent 2 seconds of cups disposed of in NYC.

Artworks such as these may not solve the severity of our wastefulness, but they provide a fresh way to see the issue and offer a platform for conversation about hyper-consumption and our disposable culture.

For more info on the Good To Go campaign and projects visit: www.goodtogocup.com

The DO School Visits The Hudson Company

Several days ago the DO School fellows and Challenge Lab facilitator Scott Francisco took a short walk from the Made in NYC Media Center to the nearby Hudson Company in Dumbo, Brooklyn. The Company was founded by a man named Jamie Hammel who chose to apply his business education to the arts of fine woodworking and reclamation.

When he began his research on the subject, he discovered a small group of productive woodchucks who were deeply passionate about wood but lacked the business knowledge to work on a larger scale or with more mainstream clients and firms. In response he established his business to offer a platform for these fine woodworkers who were so diligently rescuing and upcycling old timbers from abandoned or condemned buildings such as old barns and tobacco mills.

I was pleasantly delighted and surprised to walk into the showroom, where a variety of woods hang, most of them samples of one of a kind “limited batches”, and some of them hundreds of years old. The company focuses mainly on flooring and interior design applications but shares the showroom with Mark Jupiter, a man and his crew who are making beautiful furniture with the woods that Jamie sources and processes at a mill 90 miles to the North of NYC. I look forward to visiting the mill one day with my brother James who is also a passionate woodworker and currently making furniture in Santa Fe, NM from reclaimed shipping pallets. Some of his past work can be found here.

All the best to Jamie, his crew and their upcoming projects such as the flooring of the new Whitney Museum in NYC.

– Joseph Stodgel 3/14/14

A Sneak Peek at Some of my DO School Fellowship Notes

Here is a shot that my new friend Mai (another of the DO School Fellows) took of some of the fresh notes that I am producing and will be feeding back to the supporters of my crowdfunding campaign which has only 2 DAYS LEFT!

Jo's Notes s

If you have yet to then know that you have a very limited amount of time to get in on the notes, the Eco-brick T-shirts, the Painting Prints, the Job’s Tears, the Heart Wave Dorjes, and the one of a kind paintings I am making!

Support, share, and spread the word in the final approach! 🙂

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/jo-stodgel-s-nyc-fellowship-with-the-do-school